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How To Talk To Your Child About Learning Disabilities

How To Talk To Your Child About Learning Disabilities. Encourage your child to engage and ask questions when they are. Let them think of what might work and make decisions.

The education of children with disabilities risks falling
The education of children with disabilities risks falling from www.news.uct.ac.za

Remind your child it’s ok to talk about what’s scary, and that you’re there to listen. Encourage your child to engage and ask questions when they are. After that, they may learn to recognize and appreciate differences in others without judgment.

Don’t be afraid to talk about the challenges their disabilities cause, but always offer positive support that will keep them confident and encourage them to work toward a successful outcome.


Then work together to come up with some conversation starters they can use: Before speaking with teachers, educate yourself about your child’s learning disability. Talk about the science behind your child’s disability, or acknowledge that while other kids can take the stairs, they need to use an elevator.

Sometimes, school teachers are not trained to teach children with learning disabilities, or the school may not recognise your child’s learning disability.


Take care to separate the person from his or her disability by talking to your child about how he and the person with the disability are similar. Ld online is the leading website on learning disabilities, learning disorders and differences. The first step is for your child to notice and appreciate their own attributes and feelings.

Learning how to talk about a learning disability is the first step to being able to advocate for themselves now and in the future.


Remind your child that while it isn’t always easy for this person, they found strategies that help. The first step parents have to take is accepting that their child has been diagnosed with a learning disability that will make academics more challenging throughout the education years. Let them think of what might work and make decisions.

You and your child can depend on these allies to support you and reinforce the message with other family members.


Let your child know that they are not alone. Some ideas to help educate your children on disabilities include: Perhaps they are the same age, or maybe they both have a pet fish.

The signs of learning disabilities vary from person to person.


Say things like, “the muscles in your uncle’s legs don’t work like yours. For example, maybe your child and his neighbor who has down syndrome both love to watch football and go swimming. Picture and chapter books are a great way to help your child learn about children with special needs.

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