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How To Talk To Your Child About Domestic Violence

How To Talk To Your Child About Domestic Violence. Children within these risk groups may have “several overlapping issues”, says bonnick. Talk to a domestic violence advocate, a counselor, or a trusted friend or family member about your situation and how you can keep yourself and your children safe.

Talking to your Kids About Domestic Violence
Talking to your Kids About Domestic Violence from parenting.firstcry.com

Talk to a domestic violence advocate, a counselor, or a trusted friend or family member about your situation and how you can keep yourself and your children safe. Find out what your kids have heard at school. The child may continue to see or relive images, sensations, or memories of the domestic violence despite trying to put them out of mind.

You may want to talk to your local women’s aid organisation, or to the freephone 24 hour national domestic violence helpline (run in partnership between women’s aid and refuge) on.


Talk to a domestic violence advocate, a counselor, or a trusted friend or family member about your situation and how you can keep yourself and your children safe. Children can find it difficult to talk about domestic abuse for many reasons. Find out what your kids have heard at school.

Emphasize that schools are very safe.


The child may avoid situations, people, and reminders associated with the violence, or may try not to think or talk about it. It is important for your child to feel supported. How to keep your children safe.

This fact sheet discusses the importance of recognizing and dealing with one's own feelings before talking to children.


Give information at age appropriate levels and put events into context. Listen and believe what they are saying. Think first about your safety and support system.

Presenters will also talk about how it intersects with those affected by domestic violence, particularly children.


However, your communication and support can help your kids do better in the aftermath of their experiences. Domestic violence is never okay or excusable, and everyone has the right to live a life free from fear, harm and control. Let children talk about their feelings, help put them into perspective, and assist them in expressing these feelings appropriately.

It is hard for most teens to talk about their dating experiences that involve partner violence.


Early trauma, such as neglect or living with domestic violence, may have affected the way they react to. Provides parents information on how to talk to children about domestic violence. These ideas are to help you support your children.

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