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How To Talk To Your Child Who Is Being Bullied

How To Talk To Your Child Who Is Being Bullied. Ask your child what they would do if they were bullied, how they would react and what they would want to happen, this can be a great way to let them know what steps to take such as confide in someone they trust, collect screenshots or keep a diary of incidents. If your child has been presenting warning signs (see above) and you suspect that something just doesn’t feel right, talk to your child about your observations and concerns.

9 signs your child is being bullied Parenting
9 signs your child is being bullied Parenting from www.greatschools.org

Parents create trust with children by initiating open, honest discussions. Praise your child for doing the right thing by talking to you about it. Asking whether your child has ever witnessed bullying may be easier for your child to answer than if you begin by asking if she’s ever been a target.

A good rule of thumb is:


If your child has been presenting warning signs (see above) and you suspect that something just doesn’t feel right, talk to your child about your observations and concerns. Teach your child strong communication skills to help them speak up against bullying. Do a good deed for the child that was bullied;

Ask a teacher or a school counselor if your child is facing any problems at school, such as if your child is struggling with a particular subject or has difficulty making friends.


Write an apology letter to the child that was bullied; According to the substance abuse and mental health services administration, spending just 15 minutes a day talking to your child helps prevent bullying and reassures them they can turn to you when they have a problem. But you have to take control of yourself and the way to do that is to sit next to them and calm down and let them see that you will listen.

Tell the school each time there is an incident.


Ask them for advice on how you and your child can work through the problem. You may want to blow your top at first, but that could just escalate the problem. If your child is being bullied, there are ways to help lessen its lasting impact.

Almost 21% of children are being bullied right now, so don’t think it can’t happen to your family.


Parents create trust with children by initiating open, honest discussions. Listen to everything your child has to say and then validate his feelings. Remind your children not to give out photos, descriptions, phone numbers, or addresses to people online, and especially to keep their passwords safe.

Praise your child for doing the right thing by talking to you about it.


Only about 20 to 30 percent of students who are bullied notify an adult about the situation. Once she’s talking about the subject and has seen that your reaction is compassionate rather than judgmental, she may feel less embarrassed to tell you about her own experiences. Tell your kids to talk to you or another adult if they are being bullied or witness someone else being bullied.

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