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How To Support Children's Transitions

How To Support Children's Transitions. Many autistic children rely on routine to cope with everyday demands. C children’s individual interests, learning, development and strengths are recognised, valued and built on.

Countdown & Stoplight Boards {Transition Strategy
Countdown & Stoplight Boards {Transition Strategy from www.pinterest.com

P17 confirm with the child or young person that you have understood what they have told you Friends are important, whatever the age. This brief considers how children’s skills and concepts in the various head start early learning outcomes framework domains play a role as they transition from one setting to another.

Once you have chosen your child’s school and secured a place it is time to think about transition.


Friends are important, whatever the age. Create a routine and stick to it. For children who have difficulty transitioning, remind them to go to the schedule and tell you what is next.

Transitions do matter to children and families, in the new context they matter even more.


Transition to a new age group or room practices. It is equally terrifying as it is exciting for you and your child. Knowing these milestones and skills allows you to provide children what they need to transition.

C children’s individual interests, learning, development and strengths are recognised, valued and built on.


Use visuals, movement activities and songs to signal transitions. How these transitions are managed can make a real difference to Try using a visual timer.

Supporting children’s transitions this information is an extension to the transition matters framework 2016 and will support you and (where appropriate) your staff team to ensure a smooth transition when you are accepting new children who are vulnerable or whose parents/carers are critical workers that do not usually attend your setting.


Taking children to visit their new school with a trusted adult and peers who will also be attending can aid a positive transition, by encouraging children to explore the new environment from the safe base of people they know. This will help parents to feel more involved in the process and will give them an opportunity to give any feedback on how they are feeling about the transition. Starting school is often much easier with a friend.

Support plans are an important addition to the early years transfer record and should be passed to the school or new setting when the child leaves.


Many autistic children rely on routine to cope with everyday demands. How to support a child with horizontal transitions. This topic discusses possible challenges.

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