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How To Talk To Your Child About Epilepsy

How To Talk To Your Child About Epilepsy. There are also adults who have it. Above all, make sure they know that they’re safe, that there are many children like them who have epilepsy, and be sure to let them know what their condition means and how to handle a seizure should.

Epilepsy Service Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust
Epilepsy Service Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust from www.sheffieldchildrens.nhs.uk

Talking to others about your child’s epilepsy can be a very positive experience. Communication may help calm their fears and help them to adjust to life with. Epilepsy classroom is a tremendous program for parents, teachers and school officials to help you, not only spread and bring epilepsy awareness to the classroom, but doing so in a manner that is both factual and very informative.

If you don't know the answer to a question, tell them you will find out and then follow through.


You don’t say how old your child is, but there is a book about epilepsy that may be helpful for your child. Make sure the bathroom door opens outward so that you can open it,. But just as you want to make sure your kids are okay, you should trust that your children want to play a role in making sure you are okay, too.

Talking about epilepsy with your child.


Encourage your child to join clubs and sports leagues, pursuing interests as they previously did. You can explain to your child that there are many other children in the world who live with epilepsy as well. Sometimes listening is the best form of support.

You may want to share them with your child's teacher, too.


Above all, make sure they know that they’re safe, that there are many children like them who have epilepsy, and be sure to let them know what their condition means and how to handle a seizure should. If you have other children, they too will need to be told. An older child may initially refuse to talk about epilepsy, however, most children will cope better once they understand what is going on.

It is likely that your child will suspect something is going on in his or her brain.


Sometimes, people may feel awkward or not know what to say or do, particularly if they are unfamiliar with epilepsy or have never witnessed a seizure. Learn as much about epilepsy as you can. When talking to kids about childhood epilepsy, it’s important to be honest and open about the condition.

If your child asks you a question you can’t answer, then find the answer and follow up with them.


There are also adults who have it. Originally printed in epilepsyadvocate, fall 2018. Try to focus on the positives as much as possible.

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