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How To Talk To Your Child About Puberty

How To Talk To Your Child About Puberty. When talking to kids about puberty, it’s important to offer reassurance that these changes are normal. Take a listen on your favorite podcast app or in the player below:

Talking to your kids about sexual health, puberty Norton
Talking to your kids about sexual health, puberty Norton from nortonchildrens.com

Consider that some changes, such as the onset of menstruation, can occur as early as age nine. “if not, i encourage parents to start these conversations. Make him close the door when using the bathroom.

Share your experiences and stories from your teenage to lighten up their mood.


Teaching your child about puberty should start before changes begin to take place and continue until they cross the bridge into adulthood. Paige hertweck, m.d., pediatric and adolescent gynecologist with norton children’s gynecology, affiliated with the uofl school of medicine, recommends that parents start talking about puberty with their daughters by age 7 or 8. These changes are just happening earlier in his or her body than they should.

Parents might feel embarrassed discussing these sensitive topics, but kids often are relieved to have them take the lead once in a while.


Include tasks, which will help them in bonding with you. This will help them to know that puberty is not something to be frightened of. “if not, i encourage parents to start these conversations.

Puberty and how their body is changing.


Puberty brings about so many changes. They may become anxious about what is normal. Begin with explaining what a pad is and what it is used for.

Reassure your child that these changes are normal and all of his or her friends will eventually go through puberty, too.


Content start “the talk” early today, kids are exposed to so much information about sex and relationships on tv and the internet that by the time they approach puberty, they may be familiar with some advanced ideas.and yet, talking about the issues of puberty remains an important job for parents because not all of a child’s information comes from reliable sources. Some girls are already wearing a sports bra by age 8, and some boys start getting facial hair just a few years later. This is better because he’s at a stage when he doesn’t see himself as too old to speak to his mothers about certain things and also makes it less awkward for both of you.

Talking to your child about growing up and puberty.


Consider that some changes, such as the onset of menstruation, can occur as early as age nine. By approaching the topic in a straightforward, factual manner, you help kids understand they don't need to feel embarrassed or ashamed about the very normal changes happening to their bodies. Remember, we all have bodies, go through puberty, and are sexual creatures.

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